Further Reading

Jump to: 'Monkseaton Village, Volume 1' | 'Monkseaton and Hillheads' | 'Historical Notes on Cullercoats,
Whitley and Monkseaton'
| 'The Maid of Monkseaton' | 'Inns and Taverns of North Shields' | 'Offbeat'
'Monkseaton Village, Volume 2' by Charlie Steel
Summerhill Books, 2012 — ISBN 9781906721565


Released in November 2012, this illustrated book continues the history of Monkseaton Village with a comprehensive overview of the Railway System, Schools and Education, Places of Worship, the People and Local Businesses, etc, etc...

'Monkseaton Village, Volume 1' by Charlie Steel
Summerhill Books, 2012 — ISBN 9781906721497


Released in June 2012, this illustrated book begins the history of Monkseaton Village with an in depth account of its early origins taking us through to the present day with a look at the Farms, Fields, Streets, Places, Trades, Buildings and Public Houses etc.

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'Monkseaton and Hillheads' by Charlie Steel
Tempus Publishing, 2000 — ISBN 9780752420646


Released in September 2000, this illustrated book gives a basic pictorial overview of Monkseaton, Hillheads and the nearby villages over the past 100 years.

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'Historical Notes on Cullercoats, Whitley and Monkseaton'
Frank Graham, 1980, Out of print


An accountant by profession, William Weaver Tomlinson was a prominent local historian and writer and his residence for many years was at Lillevilla, in Hawthorn Gardens, Monkseaton.

The most well known of his books was entitled 'Tomlinson's Comprehensive Guide to Northumberland'; however another publication called 'Historical Notes on Cullercoats, Whitley and Monkseaton. first appeared in 1893.

This book was last reprinted in 1980, by local publisher, Frank Graham, and although scarce, copies can still occasionally be found at many good second hand booksellers.

The book itself takes the reader on a fascinating journey through Cullercoats, Whitley, Monkseaton and Tynemouth as the writer describes all the interesting streets, buildings and history associated with these places in the late 1800s.


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'The Maid of Monkseaton'
1908, Out of print


Probably the only known fictional work ever written about Monkseaton was this book by local author James Cuthbertson, entitled 'The Maid of Monkseaton' and published in 1908.

The book is a 335 page historical novel about a Saxon maid living amongst the monks, during the 7th century. A youthful monk, one calm July evening whilst shepherding cattle through Holywell Dene, happens upon the maid in evident peril from a herd of heifers and rushes to her rescue in this wildly romantic, nail-biting searing saga.

Although scarce to find, North Tyneside Libraries have copies available for the lending.


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'Inns and Taverns of North Shields' by Charlie Steel
Tempus Publishing 2007 — ISBN 9780752443652


It has often been said that the best way to learn history is to study castles and churches; however it cannot be denied that the best way to learn about the history of North Shields is to study the Pubs!

From 1822 to the present day, approximately 440 Public Houses have been recorded in North Shields with over 110 additional premises in the surrounding areas. These numbers do not include the small independent Ale, Porter, Wine & Spirit Merchants, and Brewers which themselves numbered in excess of 225.

As a relatively small town in the 1800's, North Shields has probably had the highest number of Inns, Taverns, Ale Houses and Beer Sellers to be found anywhere in the country. The Low Town in particular had an extremely high concentration of pubs, with some Inns actually adjoining the next one, and others just being a matter of feet away from the next.

In 1853 alone, it was estimated there were 217 Inns, Taverns and Alehouses in the Borough of Tynemouth, which included North Shields, Tynemouth and Cullercoats.

Many of these establishments, particularly those in the 'Low Town' of North Shields, were dirty and seedy drinking dens of vice and intemperance, dimly lit with tallow candles, where drunkenness and prostitution were commonplace and many unlawful and immoral schemes were plotted.

Those dark days have disappeared into the mists of time, and most of the Inns and Taverns of the past have long since been demolished. The Chirton and Percy Main areas comprised around 17 Public Houses, and Preston Township had 14 known Inns and Taverns. Over the years, Tynemouth was well catered for, with around 34 establishments, and moving north up the coastline to Cullercoats there are 11 recorded here, including the modern premises on Marden Estate. Next was Whitley Bay (Whitley Township), which had around 24 Inns, Taverns, and Hotels but that excludes any of the modern theme bars in the South Parade area which tend to change their names on a regular basis, and strictly speaking, cannot be considered as true pubs anyway.

Monkseaton Village has had 8 Inns and Taverns over the years, and Earsdon Village has had 6. The Backworth and Shiremoor Areas, including New York and Murton Village, had 12 licensed premises. (It should however be remembered that not all of these premises existed at any one time.)

This 128 page publication by local historian Charlie Steel serves as a reminder of not just the old pubs in the area, but also of the newer ones that have appeared up to the present day. The book is an illustrated gazetteer and directory which gives a fascinating insight into the many Inns, Alehouses and Taverns that have existed in North Shields and the surrounding areas over the past two centuries, and includes old photographs with sections covering: Tynemouth, Whitley Bay, Monkseaton, Earsdon, Shiremoor and Backworth.


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'Offbeat' by Ken Banks
Summerhill Books, 2010 — ISBN 9781906721312


Compiled and written by Ken Banks (ex-Tynemouth Borough Police Sergeant and Police Historian), this Local History book represents and illustrates a wonderful history of the Tynemouth Borough Police Force, from its earliest origins in the mid 1800s to its final days when it was amalgamated into Northumbria Police.

If you have an interest in Local History or Local Policing in Tynemouth and North Shields, then this book is an absolute 'must-have'.
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